Collection: PART THREE

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"Talk is cheap" Short one minute clip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tyrell Peters - Aint that Bad (Directed by Melissa Cofie)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The A- Z of South London trailer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Everyday London

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Peckham Peace Wall

Gillian Wearing - Projection experimentation

"Talk is cheap" Short film (Final piece)

This one minute clip is the the final piece I have produced as a result of the foundation course and acts as a short snippet of my upcoming short film on the Gentrification of London. After experimenting with using editing software, Final cut pro, I composed the idea of creating a trailer as a contribution to the final finished documentary I plan to have completed filming and editing during the summer. The finished film will include footage from a trip I will take to Atlanta, Virginia and Washington throughout the month of August.

My decision to highlight the message "Talk is cheap" as the topic of Gentrification is made to appear as a positive change to the community, while ironically it is the factor which is destroying the diversity and culture in areas such as East and South London for example. Including audio from the Boyz in da Hood film gave the video it's meaning, as a means of destroying the feeling of ambiguous directing the audience further toward the message of the video. 

As part of the filming process I have recruited some models of African background of all shades, which is most important to this project. I will also be collaborating with a few companies Mojo Kojo UK, Alero Jasmine clothes and Knots UK to name but a few, these companies design clothing lines specific to highlighting the beauty in Black culture and West African culture in particular. 

 

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Tyrell Peters - Ain't that bad (Directed by Melissa Cofie)

Approaching the deadline for film admissions to the showreel, I decided to film one last video. I revisited the Aylesbury estate with Tyrell Peters, a rapper who had helped be compose a song based on Maya Angelou's 'Ain't that Bad' poem, without much planning we took to film the music video which I later edited using Final Cut Pro. 

A part of the music video was filmed in the playground and carpark infront of the block which I grew up in as a child, adding a more personal element to the message of the video. Moreover, the choice to film this video at a location which is planned for regeneration this summer was especially important as this was a way to say a final goodbye. As a means of finally documenting the Aylesbury estate as evidence that it did once exist. 

 

Using Maya Angelous's poem as a template only provides more meaning and truly helps demonstrate the negative connotations attached to South London, in relation to  crime, violence and poverty, therefore the councils decision to regeneration and cleanse London of the source of it's culture and diversity.

By filming this music video in one evening, I feel I challenged myself mostly with timescale as we began filming at 6pm and planned to continue until sunset due to lack of artificial lighting, we had to make much use of the natural lighting provided.

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The A- Z of South London trailer

The A-Z of South London was the result of my first attempt at experimentation with found footage taken from Gentrification documentaries I had watched on youtube. The creation of this short film was inspired by I-D'S A-Z collection of short films. As well as, the soundtrack used for this video "Find your wings" by Tyler the creator featuring Kalis Uchis. Although this is only a one minute clip, this illustrates my concept of bringing out the beauty of South London, as a means of working against the negative stigma which provoked the council's aim for regeneration. 

I felt that this idea was much stronger and more practical to achieve than filming a short documentary which required interviewing people, but both ideas would still equally be able to achieve the same level of awareness about Gentrification. I also felt this film idea was more achievable as I would autonomously be carrying out this project on my own with no film crew, organising the hiring of the audio and film equipment would be especially difficult for one person while trying to get permission to film also. In hindsight, I now realise that a suitable method to overcome the problem of filming interviews independently would be to use a tripod to setup the camera to feature the interviewee and myself as the interviewer also.

 

  

 

 

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Everyday London

As a part of experimentation I used my mobile phone to record my journey on way and from Central Saint Martins. I then used Final cut pro to assemble the footage together in a grid style organised in chronological order. 

In hindsight, I could have improved this method of filming by renting a Go Pro hero 3 camera including headgear from the Central Loan store. This would allow me to better capture images and footage without the struggle of having to hold the camera, therefore avoiding camera shake. This would equal a better and more professional looking outcome.

However, my choice to include pre recorded audio downloaded from Youtube would still be necessary as the GoPro camera does not record audio of a good quality, bringing down the overall quality of my piece. Although, a method of overcoming this would be to use my phone or another form of handheld audio recorder to record my conversations and encounters throughout the period I choose to record for.


The most successful aspect of this piece, I feel was the inclusion of tempo/speed to create a feeling on monotony. This was my attempt at demonstrating how monotonous  our daily routines are, Wake up, eat, get ready, work, go home, sleep, wake up and repeat the cycle again. I feel that this could have been better achieved by experimenting with colour grading effects to provoke certain emotions through the audience.

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